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Army out on the streets of Manchester

 A trip into Manchester today and there was a Freedom of the City Parade for the 209 (The Manchester Artillery) Battery, 103rd Regiment Royal Artillery, an honour bestowed in recognition of over 200 years service to the city. It all provided a good opportunity to go for a prowl with the camera. It was a colourful day and made all the better as purely by chance I met up with a couple of the older guys in the pics later on. It was good to talk and gave me the chance to share the photos with them. So in another unlikely plot twist, my pics are now doing the rounds of regimental Facebook pages. How meta is that?










And then when wandering down Market Street someone had parked up a Landrover, set up a sound system, put a sheet over their head and started dancing in the back. Well somebody has to do it.


And Piccadilly Gardens seldom disappoints.



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