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A walk over Lantern Pike and then over to the shooting cabin on Kinder


 A beautiful day today, warm in the sun, frost still on the ground and less than a week to go before Christmas day. I took Flo and walked up over Lantern Pike from New Mills, then over to the shooting cabin in the foothills of Kinder, then down to Hayfield and back to New Mills along the Sett Valley Trail. It is one of my favourite walks and today the light was breathtaking, so I took plenty of photographs. Here are a few.

Moorland, somebody pointing at Kinder
Hollingworth Clough - upstream

Hollingworth Clough - downstream

Hollingworth Clough

Hollingworth Clough

Hollingworth Clough

Heading for the shooting cabin

Moorland

Flo - portrait

An amazing light on Kinder today

Cairn, Kinder

Sunset and aeroplanes, from Kinder

Shooting cabin, Kinder

Trees through mist, above Hayfield








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